Close
 
JuniorHockey.ca
News DailyDish Players
Radio Discuss

Notes From A Hockey Mom: Prison Tactics Canadian Junior Hockey News

Published: Thursday, 7 May 2020  
By: Michelle Anderson, Behind the Champ


Quarantine is like a prison, especially for young people, so why not look to prison tactics for helping you stay in hockey shape? I hear some of those guys come out of there pretty shredded, and while I’m no prison expert, those prisoners are mostly stuck with only what they have in their cells.  We can do the same at home with just a little creativity.

No gym access doesn’t mean you are stuck with running.  In fact, if you are a hockey player, you don’t want to run for distance anyway.  You are better off doing tempo runs which are basically short distances at about 75% speed with a minute or so in between.  So you’ll run 50 to 60 yards, rest for a minute, do that five times, rest for 3-5 minutes to full recovery, and then do another five.  Your local high school track will already have this distance measured out for you, and since the track team isn’t happening right now either, you’ll probably have it all to yourself.  If a track isn’t accessible, run the length of one city block or run to the end of your cul-de-sac.

No weights or kettlebells?  No problem!  You can fill a backpack with books or other heavy objects, you can use empty paint cans, water jugs, jugs of laundry detergent, single bricks, or fill pillowcases with books like a prisoner might.

No agility ladder?  Use electrical tape or duct tape on the basement or garage floor or use sidewalk chalk on the driveway.  

No pull up bar?  I don’t know how many hockey players are doing pull ups, but if you were so inclined, you could head to the park and use the monkey bars.

No medicine ball?  Use a basketball or soccer ball.

No battle ropes?  An old hose won’t be quite as heavy, but it’s close enough to give you some results.

No plyo box?  You can use a bench or stairs or build one.  The home improvement stores are still open.

Speaking of home improvement stores, you can also DIY some hockey training aids. A shooting pad can be a sheet of HDPE or melamine with some silicone lubricant or furniture polish.  The DIY version requires a reapplication of the furniture polish every hundred shots or so, but if you’re willing to do that, it can be a big money saver.  

You can also DIY one of those puck handling trainers with a length of 2x4 and either shorter lengths of 2x4 or 1x2 or some large PVC end caps.  You could make one that’s long and straight or curve it with shorter lengths of board. You could also use broken sticks in place of the 2x4.

If you’ve got a home gym set up already, great, but if not, that is not an excuse not to work out.  You can still stickhandle and shoot, and you can still work on strength, agility, and cardio.  You don’t get to complain about what you didn’t get because of the work you didn’t do.



Author: Michelle Anderson from Behind the Champ
Hello! I am a Minnesota hockey mom of 15 years with a son currently playing junior hockey. My son was 2 ½ when he saw his first hockey game, and he became obsessed with playing hockey himself. I thought, “He’s 2. It will pass.” It didn’t. I have to admit that I knew absolutely nothing about hockey when we first started this journey, but I learned quickly along the way thanks to all the other hockey parents out there. I also saw how much fun he was having so I joined a women’s league and learned how to play myself. The kids make it look a lot easier than it is, but it’s a beautiful game and tons of fun both to watch and to play, even badly in my case. I look forward to bringing you a hockey mom’s point of view to these shenanigans in the world of junior hockey.


* Disclaimer: This site may contain advice, opinions and statements from various authors and information providers. Views expressed in this article reflect the personal opinion of the author, Michelle Anderson, and not necessarily the views of JuniorHockey.ca. JuniorHockey.ca does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other info provided in the article, or from any other member of this site.
See more of JuniorHockey.ca by logging in
Your online community for Junior Hockey!
AboutAdvertiseContact